The Girl of His Dreams by Donna Leon

In “The Girl of his dreams”, the 17th in the wonderful Commissario Brunetti series, we once again are privileged to witness the author Donna Leon on top form.

Every single book in the series is excellent.

Each book, and they are all stand-alone books by the way, is a love-song to Venice.

Each one is also a cracking mystery.

And – and this is what makes Ms Leon’s books so very, very absorbing – in each book, she shines her spotlight ioto another aspect of the city.

In this book, it is the plight of the refugees and the gypsies (“Rom” we are often reminded to call them, by various characters in the book) who flock to the city and who are viewed with great suspicion and open dislike by so many residents.

We meet up again, with great pleasure, with the thoroughly decent, thoroughly likeable Commissario Brunetti, his wife Paola and their 2 now-teenaged children, Raffi and Chiara.

One never tires of joining the Brunettis at table, as they eat, and enjoy their wine and post-dinner grappa on their terrace, as the children recount their day, and quiz their parents about current affairs. There is always talk of English literature, thanks to the ferociously well-read Paola, there is hearty criticism of much of what ails Italy – politics and corruption, and there is much robust criticism of the church.

Through these dinner-table conversations, we feel fully immersed in the day to day life of Venice and her citizens.

With each book, we learn another detail or two about the Commissario, his wife and his children – a family that is totally engaging and endearing.

In this book, we see a little more of the home life of Brunetti’s trusty assistant, Vianello and his wife Nadia, and with great pleasure, we catch up with the ever-glamorous and ever-resourceful Signorina Elettra Zorzi.  Signorina Elettra is a wonderfullly resourceful young woman, casually navigating her way through the city’s computer systems, mining information to help Brunetti and Vianello, though she actually works for the vain and self-absorbed Vice-Questore Patta.

Patta is on top form in this book, trying to use English buzz-words such as “inter-cultural dynamics” despite his impenetrable Sicilian accent, and – as ever – firmly on the side of the rich and famous, rather than the rule of law.

There are two story lines running through this book, one involving religion and the other the death of a child.

There is genuine sorrow and horror amongst the policemen and forensic technicians who, although used to death, are still horrified at the sight of the drowned corpse of a little girl with long blond hair:

“Bocchese, Rizzardi, and the first technician knelt around the body, and something perverse in Brunetti led his mind to the Magi and the countless paintings he had seen of three men kneeling around another child.”

The investigation into the death of the child leads Brunetti and Vianello into a world they have not hitherto encountered, that of the secretive and unfriendly gypises – Rom – who exist on the margins of Italian society, and are both disliked and misunderstood by the Venetians.

We see another side of the city, that of dispossessed people and there is a roughness and ugliness to the world they inhabit, especially when seen through the eyes of a man with the aesthetic sense of Commissario Brunetti.

An excellent read – as are all the Brunetti novels – with death and religion as the central themes that are woven into the narrative. An enthralling plot, lots of twists and turns and, as ever, the magnificent canvas of La Serenissima.

If you haven’t already read this book, please do go ahead and order your copy right now.

Couldn’t be easier – the link is below.

SUFFER THE LITTLE CHILDREN by Donna Leon

I am at that stage in my binge-reading of the wonderful Commissario Brunetti’s series when I need to slow down.

In no time at all, I’ve reached the end of the 16th in this stunning series of detective novels set in Venice, and –  yet again – I close the book with a sigh of enjoyment, mingled with sadness at another book being finished, and unbridled admiration for Ms Leon.

In every one of these novels, Venice is there, centre-stage, a stunning backdrop for the crimes that the sensitive, family-loving Commissario must solve.  In every book –  and they are all total stand-alone novels, by the way – Ms Leon manages to highlight a different aspect of the city, so even though we see the city and the canals and the churches in all her books, we always see them through a different prism.

The central characters are all here, yet again, thank goodness.

The Commissario, a good man, if ever there was one.  Thoughtful, loving, honest.  In love with his family and his city.

His delightful wife Paola.

His children, Raffi and Chiara, who have grown up before our eyes, as it were, over the course of the books.  The children appear in this 16th book, as usual, around the family dinner table, but they also appear in a different way.  Commissario Brunetti is investigating a racket in the city concerning adopted babies, and every time he has a sad or a disturbing encounter involving babies, unwanted or otherwise, he remembers his own children when they were babies and toddlers, his fierce, unqualified love for them so wonderfully obvious.

The  loyal Viannello is at the Commissario’s side, as is the fabulous Signorina Elettra, always glamorous and always delving deep into the computers of the city’s municipal services, banks, government offices -wherever she can mine information for Brunetti and Vianello.  The latter has, over the course of the years (read novels) familiarised himself with computers and the internet, so he can fully appreciate Elettra’s skills.  Brunetti remains something of a Luddite where computers are concerned and, more over, prefers not to ask too many questions as to where exactly the young lady gets the invaluable information she finds.

The venal Vice-Questore Patta is, as ever, more concerned by appearances than solving crimes.

We enjoy the wine that invariably accompanies the happy family meals that are so important for Guido Brunetti.  We savour the food with them.  We listen to the children chat about school.  We are part of a Venetian family, in other words.

Another wonderful instalment in this engrossing series.

Should you wish to buy the book now, it couldn’t be simpler.  Here’s the link to Amazon.

THE ANONYMOUS VENETIAN by Donna Leon

At times, it’s almost embarrassing how late I come to some parties.

Like the Donna Leon party.

How on earth did I miss Ms Leon’s utterly wonderful detective novels, set in Venice?  Where was I all the years that everyone else was reading and raving about Donna Leon’s wonderful writing, brilliant scene-setting and palpable love for Venice?

Luckily I have a ferociously well-read sister, who mentioned these books to me when we were all in Venice last year for her daughter’s wedding, and now I am binge-reading them.

Which is kind of wonderful as well, rather than reading and then having to wait a year…

“The Anonymous Venetian”, the 3rd in the Commissario Brunetti series brings us back into the world of this family-minded, decent Venetian detective.

We walk the streets with him, we travel along the canals by boat with him, we suffer through the stiflingly hot summer with him, somewhat relieved by chilled white wine and fresh figs.

Ms Leon loves Venice, and knows it in intimate detail, and her writing brings this stunning city to life.  The food, the markets, the regular, non touristy neighbourhoods, the under-belly –  for, sadly, every beautiful place has its less desirable side.

In this book, the under-belly involves murder and money, a fairly classic combination.

Ms Leon tells a gripping detective tale, woven through with the sights and smells and sounds of the city of Venice that is inhabited and frequented by Venetians, and not by the tourist throngs.

We can almost taste the food that Brunetti’s lovely, intelligent and long-suffering wife Paola prepares while quizzing him on the latest developments in the murder case he is investigating:

“She took some basil leaves, ran them under cold water for a moment, and chopped them into tiny pieces.  She sprinkled them on top of the tomato and mozzarella, added salt, and then poured olive oil generously over the top of everything.”

All this whilst discussing murder.

One of the many reasons that Commissario Brunetti is such a likeable man, is his compassionate nature.  Crime and exposure to violent death have not hardened him.

Here he goes to interview a suspect, and encounters the man’s bigoted “portiere” who is vulgarly voluble about his dislike of gays.

“Brunetti sighed tiredly.  Why couldn’t people learn to be more discriminating in whom they chose to hate, a bit more selective? Perhaps even a bit more intelligent?  Why not hate the Christian Democrats?  Or the Socialists? Or why not hate people who hated homosexuals?”

Amidst the murder, and attempted murder, amidst the oppressive summer heat and the depressing industrial areas of Venice that the Commissario must tramp in search of clues, there are however, moments of humour.  Brunetti calls a journalist and asks him about the self-styled title he has given himself on his answering machine.  The journalist agrees he should perhaps update his answering machine:

“It takes me forever to change the message.  So many buttons to push.  The first time I did it, I recorded myself swearing at the machine.  No one left a message for a week, until I thought the thing wasn’t working and called myself from a phone booth.   Shocking, the language the machine used.   I dashed home and changed the message immediately.  But it’s still very confusing.”

And it’s moments like that, by the way, that ever so slightly, but only ever so slightly, date the books.  But they do not impact the pleasure or the storyline whatsoever, those non existent mobile phones…not one little bit.

Another light-hearted moment (and one which struck a chord) is on the subject of the ugliest Baby Jesus search Brunetti and his wife have going:

“Then, a little to the left of the fireplace, a Madonna, clearly Florentine and probably fifteenth-century, looking adoringly down at yet another ugly baby. One of the secrets Paola and Brunetti never revealed to anyone was their decades-long search for the ugliest Christ Child in western art.  At the moment, the title was held by a particularly bilious infant in Room 13 of the Pinacoteca di Siena.  Though the baby in front of Brunetti was no beauty, Siena’s title was not at risk.”

It is this combination of a gripping plot happy, set against the backdrop of a normal family life, food, and the sheer breath-taking beauty of Venice that never ceases to astound Brunetti and through him we, the reader, that makes “The Anonymous Venetian” such a great read.

Hugely enjoyable, and I can already tell that this series is going to be completely addictive.

If you would like to buy “The Anonymous Venetian”, it couldn’t be easier.

Here you go.